Get PDF The Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think Youre Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

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Simply link your Qantas Frequent Flyer membership number to your Booktopia account and earn points on eligible orders. Either by signing into your account or linking your membership details before your order is placed. Your points will be added to your account once your order is shipped. Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! What will people think? I am enough. Pink, New York Times best-selling author of A Whole New Mind "Courage, compassion, and connection: Through Brene's research, observations, and guidance, these three little words can open the door to amazing change in your life.

We are led to believe that if we could only look perfect and lead perfect lives, we'd no longer feel inadequate. So most of us perform, please, and perfect, all the while thinking, What if I can't keep all of these balls in the air? Why isn't everyone else working harder and living up to my expectations?

What will people think if I fail or give up? When can I stop proving myself? In her ten guideposts, Brown engages our minds, hearts, and spirits as she explores how we can cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection to wake up in the morning and think, No matter what gets done and how much is left undone, I am enough , And to go to bed at night thinking, Yes, I am sometimes afraid, but I am also brave.

She calls herself a story catcher! From studying these people, she found that living authentically and wholeheartedly can make people feel vulnerable. It is sometimes the path to shame and fear, but it is also the path to joy and love and connection. The key is to cultivate a sense of worthiness. The first few chapters describe the process of living wholeheartedly generally, while the remaining chapters provide 10 guideposts - practices that support living authentically and forming authentic relationships.

I loved this book.

Brown writes eloquently about embracing who you are and letting go of shame and fear. She draws not only from her research interviews, but from her personal experience as well. The Preface begins with this quote: "Owning our story and loving ourselves through that process is the bravest thing that we will ever do. This requires courage, compassion, and connection. These are the gifts of imperfection. Because we are not perfect, we get to practice acts of courage, compassion, and connection in our everyday lives, and these acts are what help us live wholeheartedly.

Brown provides ten guideposts to help us on this journey, encouraging authenticity, resilience, gratitude, and play among other practices. There are so many quotable passages in this book. I can see myself coming back to it again and again. I was not disappointed. This book offers as set of guideposts toward Wholehearted leaving, which involves "engaging in our lives from a place of worthiness". The guideposts include cultivating self-compassion, cultivating a resilient spirit, cultivating calm and stillness, and finding meaningful work.

Let Go of Who You Think You're Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

She writes with a tone of wonderment of the discoveries that emerged from her research, and acknowledges that some of her findings were surprising or difficult for her to wrap her head around. She explains things well, clearly defining the concepts she's writing about, and uses effective examples. She writes about her " Breakdown Spiritual Awakening" and how it helped her to change perspective. She makes no attempt to hide her own fallibility, vulnerability, and imperfection.

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Brown describes compassion as a relationship between equals. She explains that being able to set boundaries is important to effectively practice compassion, even though we may not tend to associate the two concepts. She adds that we should hold people accountable for their behaviour, and in doing so separate the person from the behaviour. She also writes about the importance of self-compassion, something particularly important for those of us struggling with mental illness.

(PDF) The Gifts of Imperfection | Diana Cristurean - beivizonlabe.gq

In this book Brown talked a lot about authenticity, which comes from living Wholeheartedly. She described several elements in the choice to be authentic: becoming courageous enough to be imperfect; having compassion for the strengths and struggles all of us have; and nurturing the belonging that arises from believing we're enough. She cautions that depression and anxiety may result when we trade in authenticity for safety.

This really resonated for me, as safety has become something that I grasp onto as tightly as possible wherever I can find it. Throughout the book the author made a number of statements that really stood out for me. She wrote that "when we don't give ourselves permission to be free, we rarely tolerate that freedom in others. When we numb the painful emotions, we also numb the positive emotions.

The Gifts of Imperfection

There were also findings from her research that were somewhat surprising to me. She found that spirituality not necessarily religion was a key component of resilience. I've never been a religious person, nor have I ever been particularly spiritual, but this is some food for thought. She also concluded that we can't love others more than we love ourselves, and a sense of worthiness is essential for love and belonging.

Based on her research she constructed definitions for the key terms used in the book, definitions that go much deeper than a standard dictionary definition. A couple of examples: Intuition: "our ability to hold space for uncertainty and our willingness to trust the many ways we've developed knowledge and insight, including instinct, experience, faith, and reason.

I have a bit of a pet peeve around arbitrary capitalization e. Here at Walmart.

Your email address will never be sold or distributed to a third party for any reason. Each day we face a barrage of images and messages from society and the media telling us who, what, and how we should be. We are led to believe that if we could only look perfect and lead perfect lives, we'd no longer feel inadequate.


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So most of us perform, please, and perfect, all the while thinking, "What if I can't keep all of these balls in the air? Why isn't everyone else working harder and living up to my expectations? What will people think if I fail or give up? When can I stop proving myself? And, yes, I am imperfect and vulnerable, but that doesn't change the truth that I am worthy of love and belonging.